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Ridgeview and the Ridgeview Continuing Medical Education Program are proud to present the Ridgeview Podcast: CME Series. Quality, portable and on-demand continuing medical education, featuring a variety of our exceptional physicians, providers and other staff from Ridgeview and it's affiliates. Hosting the program are Fred Demeuse, PA-C and Jason Hicks, PA-C. Thanks for tuning-in, downloading and listening! 

 

DISCLOSURE ANNOUNCEMENT 

The information provided through this and all Ridgeview podcasts as well as any and all accompanying files, images, videos and documents is/are for CME/CE and other institutional learning and communication purposes only and is/are not meant to substitute for the independent medical judgment of a physician, healthcare provider or other healthcare personnel relative to diagnostic and treatment options of a specific patient's medical condition; and are property/rights of Ridgeview & Ridgeview Clinics.  Any re-reproduction of any of the materials presented would be infringement of copyright laws. 

It is Ridgeview's intent that any potential conflict should be identified openly so that the listeners may form their own judgments about the presentation with the full disclosure of the facts. It is not assumed any potential conflicts will have an adverse impact on these presentations. It remains for the audience to determine whether the speaker’s outside interest may reflect a possible bias, either the exposition or the conclusions presented.

Ridgeview's CME planning committee members and presenter(s) have disclosed they have no significant financial relationship with a pharmaceutical company and have disclosed that no conflict of interest exists with the presentation/educational event.

Dec 6, 2019

In this second part (part 2) of the "Joy, Empathy, and Provider Burnout" podcast, Dr. Laurie Drill-Mellum, an emergency medicine provider and a strong advocate for breaking down the communication barriers that are all too abundant today in medicine, continues her discussion around the challenging issue of "burnout" in healthcare.

Enjoy the podcast!

Objectives:  
  Upon completion of this podcast, participants should be able to:

  • Explain how developing skills of empathy can lead to better self and patient care.
  • Recognize that the continuum of emotions clinician's experience are normal and that there are ways - using intention and attention, to influence their impact on one's practice and life.
  • Give examples of my understanding to the shifting dynamics around clinician and patient expectations in the current era and how to effectively tend to them.

CME credit is only offered to Ridgeview Providers for this podcast activity. Complete and submit the online evaluation form, after viewing the activity.  Upon successful completion of the evaluation, you will be e-mailed a certificate of completion within 2 weeks.  You may contact the accredited provider with questions regarding this program at  rmccredentialing@ridgeviewmedical.org.

To receive continuing education credit for this activity - click the link below, to complete the activity's evaluation.

 CME Evaluation

(**If you are listening to the podcasts through iTunes on your laptop or desktop, it is not possible to link directly with the CME Evaluation for unclear reasons. We are trying to remedy this. You can, however, link to the survey through the Podcasts app on your Apple and other smart devices, as well as through Spotify, Stitcher and other podcast directory apps and on your computer browser at these websites. We apologize for the inconvenience.) 

The information provided through this and all Ridgeview podcasts as well as any and all accompanying files, images, videos and documents is/are for CME/CE and other institutional learning and communication purposes only and is/are not meant to substitute for the independent medical judgment of a physician, healthcare provider or other healthcare personnel relative to diagnostic and treatment options of a specific patient's medical condition.”

  

FACULTY DISCLOSURE ANNOUNCEMENT 

It is our intent that any potential conflict should be identified openly so that the listeners may form their own judgments about the presentation with the full disclosure of the facts. It is not assumed any potential conflicts will have an adverse impact on these presentations. It remains for the audience to determine whether the speaker’s outside interest may reflect a possible bias, either the exposition or the conclusions presented.

Planning committee members and presenter(s) have disclosed they have no significant financial relationship with a pharmaceutical company and have disclosed that no conflict of interest exists with the presentation/educational event.

SHOW NOTES:

CHAPTER 1:
As Fred related, our journey between starting and finishing our practice matters. The "dash" in our practice, in our lives.

Firstly, mindfulness can help us begin to "own the dash", as it will help us to slow down, notice out thoughts and feelings. The second is acceptance. Accepting that things are not always going to go well. There will be pain. In our day to day and year to year existence. What will you recall and reflect on? What will others reflect on about you? Victor Frankel in "Man's Search for Meaning", astutely points out that how we react in our lives is one of the last "true freedoms". Self-awareness is a great first step in the road to recognizing and remedying burnout. Are we experiencing dread in going to work, moodiness, arriving late to work drinking more alcohol? The vast majority of burnout tends to be due to a systems problem, especially as it relates to workload and workflow. We are asking too much of people. Therefore, it is imperative that our systems also contribute in recognizing and treating burnout. Of course, there is always the possibility that continuing to work in medicine, despite addressing burnout symptoms, changing systems, etc., may just result in the practitioner moving on to a different field or even career in some cases. The triple aim in health care is going to depend on the wellbeing of those who are doing the work. And what exactly happens when we actually lose someone to burnout? The cost is significant, and in multiple layers. Cost to replace a physician, for instance, is approximately $1.5 million. Lost revenue, recruitment costs (which can be exorbitant nowadays due to the very competitive market that is out there), loss of clientele, etc. And as it turns out, the up and coming health care providers are looking for a healthy work-life blend. Even leading to less income in order to achieve a better work culture and atmosphere.

At the same time, limiting hours and training exposure, as well as the "hands-offs" that occur in patient care, do lead to concerns for patient safety and potentially care outcomes. Supporting our colleagues in the infancy of their career as well as the twilight is equally important. While focusing on our own individual professional well-being and work-life blend, offering support as a group in general is equally important; checking-in with our colleagues and making sure they feel supported, in other words.

CHAPTER 2:
Do you experience joy or do you experience happiness in your life and career? Maybe a bit of both? Joy is continued practice, while happiness is an on and off feeling. Shauna Shapiro, a mindfulness professor, compared two people: a lottery winner and an accident victim who is paralyzed. After a year out from their very disparate experiences, they were each at the baseline level of joy. Gratitude does in fact affect your happiness, and thereby contributes to a culture and ongoing experience of joy. For instance, the three daily gratitudes as advocated by the happiness guru, Seligman. Simple, but proven to be effective, and in a very short period of time. Turning the emotional and sometimes traumatic aspect of our jobs into the privilege of having a "front seat" to the awe and mystery of patient care, as coined by Rachel Remen, can also help to shift the perspective and lead to resiliency and joy in our work. Self care and relationships is equally important. Having a "3 AM friend" for instance. We are all human and have times in our lives when we need to purge.

Recognition of value in promoting self-resilience is the first step, followed by setting a goal to do this, and then actually executing it. Whether it's a book club, a running club, gardening, etc.

While the individual is key to their own resilience, coping with and preventing burnout, we can lean on one another as well. Schwarz Rounds and peer support networks are great mechanisms to empower and lift-up the individual.

Dr. Laurie Drill-Mellum discusses the "thread" in our lives. Something that gets us from point A to point B, and through the "snow storm". What do we hold onto and what motivates us? What is it that feeds our sense of purpose? In our work, and in our personal lives. In addition, the Hopi elder metaphor of being in a canoe and getting somewhere relates that it is not so much the point of the destination, as much as who you're with on the journey.

Thanks for listening.