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Ridgeview and the Ridgeview Continuing Medical Education Program are proud to present the Ridgeview Podcast: CME Series. Quality, portable and on-demand continuing medical education, featuring a variety of our exceptional physicians, providers and other staff from Ridgeview and it's affiliates. Hosting the program are Fred Demeuse, PA-C and Jason Hicks, PA-C. Thanks for tuning-in, downloading and listening! 

 

DISCLOSURE ANNOUNCEMENT 

The information provided through this and all Ridgeview podcasts as well as any and all accompanying files, images, videos and documents is/are for CME/CE and other institutional learning and communication purposes only and is/are not meant to substitute for the independent medical judgment of a physician, healthcare provider or other healthcare personnel relative to diagnostic and treatment options of a specific patient's medical condition; and are property/rights of Ridgeview & Ridgeview Clinics.  Any re-reproduction of any of the materials presented would be infringement of copyright laws. 

It is Ridgeview's intent that any potential conflict should be identified openly so that the listeners may form their own judgments about the presentation with the full disclosure of the facts. It is not assumed any potential conflicts will have an adverse impact on these presentations. It remains for the audience to determine whether the speaker’s outside interest may reflect a possible bias, either the exposition or the conclusions presented.

Ridgeview's CME planning committee members and presenter(s) have disclosed they have no significant financial relationship with a pharmaceutical company and have disclosed that no conflict of interest exists with the presentation/educational event.

May 14, 2021

In this podcast,  Dr. Chris Mast, Vice President of Clinical Informatics with EPIC, discusses how electronic health medical records (EHRs) are essential to today's modern day medical world, about implementing and using an EHR for improving patient care, and  what the EHR future holds for healthcare.

Enjoy the podcast!

Objectives:  
  Upon completion of this podcast, participants should be able to:

  • Recognize the benefits that an integrated electronic health record system will bring to patients and healthcare providers.
  • Identify steps that healthcare providers can take to maximize their efficiency and smoothly transition to new electronic systems from existing systems.
  • List common roadblocks that prevent healthcare providers from taking full advantage of their electronic tools/resources.

CME credit is only offered to Ridgeview Providers & Allied Health Staff for this podcast activity. Complete and submit the online evaluation form, after viewing the activity.  Upon successful completion of the evaluation, you will be e-mailed a certificate of completion within approximately 2 weeks.  You may contact the accredited provider with questions regarding this program at  rmccredentialing@ridgeviewmedical.org.

Click on the following link for your CME credit:

CME Evaluation: "An EPIC Perspective on EHRs with Dr. Chris Mast"

(**If you are listening to the podcasts through iTunes on your laptop or desktop, it is not possible to link directly with the CME Evaluation for unclear reasons. We are trying to remedy this. You can, however, link to the survey through the Podcasts app on your Apple and other smart devices, as well as through Spotify, Stitcher and other podcast directory apps and on your computer browser at these websites. We apologize for the inconvenience.) 

DISCLOSURE ANNOUNCEMENT 

The information provided through this and all Ridgeview podcasts as well as any and all accompanying files, images, videos and documents is/are for CME/CE and other institutional learning and communication purposes only and is/are not meant to substitute for the independent medical judgment of a physician, healthcare provider or other healthcare personnel relative to diagnostic and treatment options of a specific patient's medical condition; and are property/rights of Ridgeview Medical Center & Clinics.  Any re-reproduction of any of the materials presented would be infringement of copyright laws. 

It is Ridgeview's intent that any potential conflict should be identified openly so that the listeners may form their own judgments about the presentation with the full disclosure of the facts. It is not assumed any potential conflicts will have an adverse impact on these presentations. It remains for the audience to determine whether the speaker’s outside interest may reflect a possible bias, either the exposition or the conclusions presented.

Ridgeview's CME planning committee members and presenter(s) have disclosed they have no significant financial relationship with a pharmaceutical company and have disclosed that no conflict of interest exists with the presentation/educational event.

SHOW NOTES:

CHAPTER 1: 
The importance of medical records has grown in the last 100 years, starting with the first paper medical records developed in the 1920s. Even back then, standardization was important, the American College of Surgeons established an association to achieve just that. In 1965, Medicaid and Medicare were developed and pushed the development of health information systems. The 1970s brought computerized physician ordering systems. The first information system was also rolled out in the University of Vermont Medical Center's gynecology unit. In the 1980s, growth in the computer world led to new possibilities in healthcare. Personal computers became more affordable. Dragons systems developed voice recognition software and by the late 1980s, Windows software was developed. From 1990 to the late 2000s there was the boom of the World Wide Web, ICD-30 coding, and legislation for the increase of electronic health records (the HiTech Act). Between 2008 and 2015 electronic health record adoption doubled.

EPIC is a privately owned company, which Dr. Mast states has allowed the company to focus on the long term, making sure that the software is a joy to use, and provide value to healthcare providers.

CHAPTER 2: 
EPIC is an integrated comprehensive electronic health record system that offers many different functions to promote better patient and health care interactions. The features of EPIC provide a one-platform system, thereby eliminating the multiple database platforms used in the past or are still being used today.

One of the big benefits of EPIC is the ability to share pertinent patient information across organizations that both work with EPIC. However, with increasing interoperability (much like cell phones bounce off other network cell towers), communication between different EHR systems increase. This interoperability will only increase as standardization of data, like how a specific diagnosis - like heart failure is coded, improves. Dr. Mast states, "playing the percentages, you will be able to connect, if not now, in the near future".

The interoperability of EPIC assists in promoting care everywhere as well as the newer share everywhere features which is a limited one-time access to care everywhere for the non-EPIC health system evaluating a patient.

CHAPTER 3: 
Connect customers, organizations that use EPIC software in partnership with another organization, benefit from a move-in ready EHR where they can start using the system immediately. The example used, is like moving into a furnished apartment, without having to find, build or organize everything. It's already there, ready to use.

EPIC is not a tiered system. There is not a platinum or gold level status. However, not every organization needs every module available on the EPIC platform. What kind of support will an EPIC customer receive? In the Connect scenario, there are essentially two groups of assistance. The connect partner, with their knowledge and support as well as the support team from EPIC. 

There is also personalization of EPIC systems to create the features and information important to the workflow of an individual clinician.

CHAPTER 4: 
EPIC is more than just a documentation software. Within the system, there are algorithms and models that allow the computer to analyze data and predict, say, patients that are trending towards sepsis. This information can be used to direct resources earlier, intervene earlier, and improve outcomes. Another example of AI modeling would be a patient discharged with congestive heart failure, and submitting daily weights. Modeling can trend that data and predict those that might fail outpatient treatment, provide opportunities for early interventions, and again, improve outcomes.

That is the present. The future of AI in electronic health records is endless. Ambient speech recognition is currently being trialed, providing documentation, transcription and even the possibility of cueing up orders. It is the fundamental theorem of informatics at work: clinician plus computer is greater than clinician alone.

Thank-you for listening.